,

Finding Fungi

Hearing that the nights are ‘fair drawing in’ is as predictable at this time of year as the leaves fluttering down or the sweet sound of geese above our head, but on the woodland floor something just as amazing becomes apparent. Fungi seems to be everywhere, but why is there so much of it at

,

Discovering the Living Landscapes in Cumbernauld

When I was asked which environmental organisations I would like to visit as part of my internship, the Scottish Wildlife Trust and the Living Landscapes Project were definitely on my list. I didn’t want to miss the opportunity to learn more about the work of one of Scotland’s most important conservation NGOs. I am originally

,

Leave no trace

The Scottish Wildlife Trust’s Seafar Wildlife Reserve is one of my favourite places in Cumbernauld to visit. The Trust is working hard to change the structure of the woodlands, helping native trees and wildflowers to flourish in the new light, open spaces. More native trees and flowers means more insects like butterflies and dragonflies, which

,

Roe a deer, a female deer….fawn is running right beside

What are those deer doing? Why on earth are they fighting? As we enter the middle of the month it’s time for one of Cumbernauld’s most commonly sighted mammals to spring into action. Mid-July to mid-August is the roe deer rutting season, when males compete for territory and mates. Unlike their Red cousins the roe

,

Green Health and Wellbeing

What happens when traditional health practitioners and green health practitioners meet? They get together around a fire and experience a great cup of tea in the outdoors! Last month, Cumbernauld Living Landscape along with eight other organisations were invited to present their projects at the Lanarkshire Green Health Volunteering event in the stunningly beautiful Chatelherault