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Thanks to you

It’s the National Lottery’s birthday— for 25 years people up and down the country have been purchasing a weekly ticket in the hope of winning a life-changing sum.For most that big day never comes, but for charity projects like Cumbernauld Living Landscape, every ticket is a winning ticket. You may have heard that Lottery money goes to ‘good causes’, but you might not know exactly what that means. Of the £40 billion that’s been raised over the past quarter century, more than £850 million has been spent on projects that are improving biodiversity across the UK. The financial support Cumbernauld Living Landscape receives from the National Lottery Heritage Fund is enabling us to improve Cumbernauld’s greenspaces for both people and wildlife over a four-year period. In the next 12 months we’ll be helping 700 young people in Cumbernauld’s schools to connect with nature, supporting adults to improve their wellbeing by exploring the outdoors and working with a hardy team of volunteers to create better homes for wildlife. Habitat projects will include peatbog restoration, meadow creation and tree planting. We’re also

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National Lottery support will help us create new connections

Cumbernauld Living Landscape has received a transformational grant of £1,375,000 from the National Heritage Lottery Fund for its new Creating Natural Connections initiative. This funding will deliver significant improvements to Cumbernauld’s environment over the next four years, and create a long-term change in the way the town’s people connect with nature. Thanks to support from players of the National Lottery nearly 3,000 primary school pupils will be given opportunities to explore nature. Groups including people at risk of poor mental health and young people at risk of disengaging from education will be given specialist support to improve their well-being, and community organisations across the town will be helped to deliver environmental improvements in their local neighbourhood. A total area of urban woodland equivalent to 230 football pitches (230 hectares) will be sustainably managed, and more than 12,000 native trees will be planted. Three peat bogs surrounded by houses will be restored, and six new community rain gardens will help reduce the impacts of flooding. Across the network better managed urban wildflower meadows will boost pollinators and increase local biodiversity. People