This Time It’s Goodbye

Sometimes you don’t realise how far you’ve come until you look back. When I think about the timid trainee who joined the Cumbernauld Living Landscape Project at the end of 2020, I can’t help but feel proud of the journey she has been on. Even just a year ago my imposter syndrome was so severe that I almost didn’t apply

A New Home for Our Little Yellow Friends

Everybody loves daffodils. Those yellow trumpets that herald the arrival of spring. I don’t think I could name a more cheerful plant. Their Latin name “Narcissus” is also the name of a Greek legend where a beautiful young man fell in love with his own reflection and stared for so long that he starved to death. Daffodils might also be

What a re-leaf it’s finally spring!

I always breathe a sigh of relief once we reach the Spring Equinox. After months of darkness, day and night are finally equal and it feels good knowing that the evenings will continue to draw out until the Summer Solstice in June. One of the best things about working outdoors is getting to experience the seasonal transitions in all their

A New Beginning

Sadly I have come to the end of my time as a Creating Natural Connections Trainee with Cumbernauld Living Landscape, so I wanted to take some time to reflect on my past few months helping to protect and enhance Cumbernauld’s many green spaces! Months ago I came to the project desperate to expand my knowledge and to develop more skills

International Women’s Day: Celebrating Our Nature Ninjas

It was a drizzly autumn day at St Maurice’s Pond. Our volunteers were soaked through, armed with scythes, teeth gritted against the rain. And as I watched them working their way through the meadow, I couldn’t help but be reminded of old photos of the Women’s Land Army. It’s important to note, Nature Ninjas is not exclusively a women’s group,

Tackling the invaders

What do buddleia, rhododendron, stoats, grey squirrels and snowberry have in common? They are all beautiful and fascinating species of animals and plants that can wreak havoc on other local wildlife if they turn up in the wrong place. Then they’re called invasive non-native species (INNS), and they’re just a few of the 3000 or so that we now have

Goodbye and Hello

Every traineeship must come to an end and the time has come for Creating Natural Connections Trainee, Katie to hand in her metaphorical badge and say goodbye. But this is not the end of her time with Cumbernauld Living Landscape. In fact it is just the beginning. Say hello to Senior Project Officer Katie Brown: For those of you who

Farewell Cumbernauld Living Landscape

I   Sadly I have come to the end of my role with Cumbernauld Living Landscape.  I have been running the volunteering and community engagement side of our project for a number of years now.  It has been incredibly rewarding to share my enthusiasm for nature with the communities of Cumbernauld. I would especially like to extend my thanks to

Our Brilliant Bogs

The Nature Ninjas have been swinging their mattocks down at Abronhill bog and Ravenswood bog, removing birch regeneration. Now you might be wondering why conservation volunteers are removing native trees but there is a very good reason for what we are doing. Trees dry out peat bogs by sucking the water out of the ground through their roots, Peatlands are

Trees for everyone

By Katie Brown, Cumbernauld Living Landscape trainee If you happen to be going to see the swans down at Broadwood Loch over the holidays, you might well spot the new trees that have been planted by the Cumbernauld Living Landscape volunteers and staff. These are native species that will help local wildlife thrive, so look out for oak, hawthorn, crab