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Cumbernauld Community Park

We’re working with North Lanarkshire Council and Friends of Cumbernauld Community Park to enhance the greenspace for both people and wildlife. As part of our Nectar Networks projects, we’ll be creating a new wildflower meadow at the park, plus a meadow of unharvested oats. The wildflower meadow will not only bring colour to the park in summer, it will also become the latest addition to Cumbernauld’s “Nectar Network”, creating a new food supply for pollinating insects such as bees, butterflies and moths. Unharvested oats hark back to the area’s agricultural past, and while they may not be feeding us humans, they’ll provide a feast for farmland birds such as skylarks, fieldfares and redwings. The meadows will create all sorts of opportunities for people to get involved, from mini-beast workshops with primary school pupils to practical conservation volunteering events. We also plan to develop creative signage that will share stories about the agricultural, social and natural history of the park.   Tell us your thoughts We want to hear your thoughts and ideas on how we can improve Cumbernauld Community Park

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Brilliant Bogs

Cumbernauld Living Landscape is working with North Lanarkshire Council to restore raised peat bogs at some of the town’s key greenspaces. Peat bogs are one of the most important habitats on the planet, providing a range of benefits often described as “ecosystem services”. Despite forming over millennia, Britain has lost as much as 94% of its peatlands in the past 100 years. When degraded or destroyed these unique habitats are lost and carbon is released into the atmosphere. There is around 3724 ha of lowland raised and intermediate bog across North Lanarkshire, representing 10% of Scotland’s coverage. Six sites in the region have SSSI (Site of Special Scientific Interest) status. North Lanarkshire Council’s Lowland Raised Bog Peatland Action Plan aims to restore and enhance the region’s peat bogs in order to boost biodiversity and tackle the climate crisis. There are several areas of raised peatbog in the Cumbernauld area, remnant pockets of what used to be a much larger interconnected wetland landscape. They have become degraded as the interconnected landscape has been lost through development. Their history is also linked to the town’s agricultural past, with

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Access to Nature

Cumbernauld is incredibly green and most people live within walking distance of a park or nature reserve. However, these greenspaces are not always as accessible as they should be. Narrow walkways, uneven surfaces, tough gradients and overgrown vegetation can all cause issues for people using wheelchairs, bikes and buggies, and for people with other mobility issues or special requirements. Over the next four years Cumbernauld Living Landscape will be upgrading paths at priority sites so that everyone can feel welcome, safe and secure while enjoying the nature on their doorstep.   Access to Nature projects are part of our Improving Habitats and Access work.     Frequently Asked Questions

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Woodland Projects

Cumbernauld Living Landscape has been working with North Lanarkshire Council to improve woodlands in selected locations across the town. Although Cumbernauld is a very green place, many of its woodlands are densely populated with the kind of trees that don’t provide the best homes for wildlife. In some areas the trees are also vulnerable to storm damage, risking harm to people and property. Our woodland management projects are creating new homes for wildlife, boosting local biodiversity and enhancing the woodland for the long-term benefit of people too. So far the work has mainly involved removing conifer trees to make way for the planting of a variety of native species in their place. Some areas have been completely cleared for this new planting, while in other areas the woodland is simply being thinned to create lighter, more open environments that will benefit local wildlife and feel safer for people to explore. The improved woodland will create better homes for wildlife, providing more food and shelter for insects, birds and small mammals.The woodlands will become safer, more natural and attractive spaces for people to

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Nectar Networks

We’re working with North Lanarkshire Council to create a series of ‘Nectar Networks’ across Cumbernauld. Nectar Networks are managed areas of naturalised grassland, often featuring native wildflowers. They are wildlife havens, creating vital habitat for a great variety of bees, butterflies and other pollinating insects. They can also develop into beautiful landscape features, especially when in full bloom. In these carefully managed areas the grass will be cut less often, allowing the natural grassland habitat to thrive. In some places more native grass and wildflower species will be planted to boost the area’s biodiversity.   Nectar Networks projects are part of our Improving Habitats and Access work.   Cumbernauld Community Park We want to hear your thoughts and ideas on how we can improve Cumbernauld Community Park for the benefit of both people and wildlife. Take part in our online consultation below, it takes around 5-10 minutes to complete. READ MORE TAKE THE SURVEY     Frequently Asked Questions

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Green Routes

Green routes detailed design Cumbernauld Green Routes is part of the Cumbernauld Living Landscape program. It is looking to transform the centre of Cumbernauld and its links to surrounding communities by creating green routes which are accessible, safe and enjoyable. Following the successful feasibility project we are currently looking into detailed designs for the route from the town centre to Abronhill. The project is being delivered through the generous support of the SUSTRANS Community Links Fund, Central Scotland Green Network, North Lanarkshire Council, Glasgow and Clyde Valley Green Network and the Scottish Wildlife Trust. See the plans Based on our previous research we have been developing detailed plans to allow us to write a funding application. The plans can be seen below and you can download the drawings.