Why not all trees are equal

  Part of our work in trying to restore our local wildlife habitats is taking out some of the things that would not be there naturally. You may have seen our teams of Cumbernauld Living Landscape volunteers out and about removing such things – which can range from litter to invasive species of plants. Some plants that are not native

Trees are amazing!

Local resident and Cumbernauld Living Landscape volunteer Josh Chambers was out investigating trees recently.  ‘There are tons of species of trees – about 60,000+ I think.  Apparently there are over 18 million live trees in Scotland.  Scotland’s most common native trees are Scots pine, birch, oak, hazel, willow, rowan, hawthorn, juniper, elder, alder and wild cherry. My grandad use to

Trees for everyone

By Katie Brown, Cumbernauld Living Landscape trainee If you happen to be going to see the swans down at Broadwood Loch over the holidays, you might well spot the new trees that have been planted by the Cumbernauld Living Landscape volunteers and staff. These are native species that will help local wildlife thrive, so look out for oak, hawthorn, crab

The cleverness of corvids

By Teri Grieve, Cumbernauld Living Landscape Trainee Some of the Cumbernauld Living Landscape team were out planting trees with our volunteers last week at Broadwood Loch, so I thought I’d tell you about others in nature that have also been helping our woodlands. Magpies, crows and jays all belong to a family of species called corvids, and they are very

A frosty walk among the Hawthorns!

Our guest blogger Josh has found some cool Hawthorns this week: “During a frosty walk at the weekend I stumbled across this tree lauded with berries. Upon research I believe it to be a hawthorn tree. These are very common everywhere in the UK and Ireland.  Hawthorn is said to be one of the most magical trees.  Interestingly, hawthorns can

Frosts, fires and foxes – what a way to start a new job!

by Katie Brown, Cumbernauld Natural Connections Trainee For those of you who don’t yet know me, hello, I’m Katie and I’m the new Creating Natural Connections trainee at Cumbernauld Living Landscape. I have lived in Cumbernauld my entire life and in this new role I hope to inspire my local community and learn something new every day. I’m only one

Deery Me!

Our volunteer blogger Josh spotted an awesome deer this week! “Its getting harder and harder to get out during the week due to the cold weather and dark nights. Luckily when wrapped up on the weekend I spotted two deer in the forest. It’s not an unusual sight for me but it’s still a thrill every time I see them,

Nature Ninjas keeping paths to nature open for everyone

At such a tough time for everyone, it is important to connect with green spaces.  These connections have been shown, in countless studies, to improve mental health. It is therefore imperative that access to green spaces remains easy and unobstructed.  These are some of Cumbernauld Living Landscape’s guiding principles. We continue to operate our “Nature Ninja” volunteer groups in these

Two new Access to Nature projects start work

Great news! As part of our Access to Nature work, which aims to make Cumbernauld’s green spaces more accessible for everyone, work is due to start on improving the paths through Seafar Woods and Ravenswood. The work has been funded primarily by the Campsies Centre. This is what we are planning: Seafar Wood path upgrades Managed by the Scottish Wildlife