Why COP26 matters to Cumbernauld

The UN Climate Change Conference (COP26) is coming to Glasgow this November, with the goal of limiting global warming to less than 2⁰C above pre-industrial levels. Attended by politicians, experts and delegations from 197 countries, they aim to: Secure commitments to drastically limit emissions of greenhouse gases. Mitigate the worst impacts of climate change. Mobilise finance to deliver these ambitious

To Bread or not to Bread: A Guide to Feeding Your Local Swans

St Maurice’s Pond is an excellent spot to see new life this summer. Lots of different birds are currently raising their young; mallards, tufted ducks, swans, coots, moorhens and many more. Feeding and watching waterfowl is a good wellbeing activity and is known to help with anxiety and depression. But how can we ensure we are feeding them the right

A yellow flood

Remember at the end of the winter, when the rain pelted down and we would find new puddles and pools had appeared overnight in the flooded fields and greenspaces around the town? Well now it is summer new pools have appeared – but instead of murky brown, this is a flood of brightest yellow. They are pools of meadow buttercups

It mast be a good year for willow

Willow catkins at seed. c. Tracy Lambert/Cumbernauld Living Landscape. I must admit it has been a bit weird seeing snow in June in Cumbernauld.  Bet that got your attention! In essence that has been what the ground has looked like this summer, all covered with willow seeds.  The edges of the grass paths have looked as if they have been

Blue shade shoes?

Cumbernauld seems to be an island sitting in a sea of violetty-blue at the moment. Whichever direction you walk in the woods the bluebells are out. Surely one of our best-known and best-loved wildflowers, they signal the height of spring like nothing else, arriving with that other harbinger of the season, the cuckoo. It’s from this co-incidence that they get

Our Brilliant Bogs

The Nature Ninjas have been swinging their mattocks down at Abronhill bog and Ravenswood bog, removing birch regeneration. Now you might be wondering why conservation volunteers are removing native trees but there is a very good reason for what we are doing. Trees dry out peat bogs by sucking the water out of the ground through their roots, Peatlands are

Birds, bees, buds, and bloom

      It’s spring! The bitterness of winter appears to be fading with fresh days that are gradually getting warmer. And we’re not the only ones to notice the longer days. Male birds are gearing up for breeding season, so have started showing off how loud and long their songs are, declaring their territory and hopefully wooing the females!

Spring foraging – fresh food for free!

by David Walsh, Cumbernauld Living Landscape Project Officer As winter drifts away and spring emerges, we start to see an abundance of wildflowers back in bloom.  Over the past year it has brought a particular sense of excitement for me.  This is due to my new hobby: foraging! Foraging is often viewed as a bit scary.  None of these plants

Birds, bees, buds, and blooms

  By Teri Grieve, Cumbernauld Living Landscape Trainee Spring is coming! The bitterness of winter appears to have been interrupted, with fresh days that are getting warmer. And we’re not the only ones to notice the longer days. Male birds are gearing up for the breeding season, so have started showing off how loud and long their songs are at