Plug Planting Plans

It has been gorgeous weather these last few weeks in Cumbernauld.  Already we are seeing various pollinators bobbling about from plant to plant as wildflowers truly emerge. Recently in Cumbernauld Glen I spotted a comma!  It’s a delightful butterfly that can be quite elusive. This experience reminded me why our work with wildflower meadows is imperative.  Our volunteers have been

Our Brilliant Bogs

The Nature Ninjas have been swinging their mattocks down at Abronhill bog and Ravenswood bog, removing birch regeneration. Now you might be wondering why conservation volunteers are removing native trees but there is a very good reason for what we are doing. Trees dry out peat bogs by sucking the water out of the ground through their roots, Peatlands are

Nature Ninjas Path Out of Lockdown

  Our Nature Ninjas were out last week for the first time this year.  It has been a long few months, but we felt confident that our secure coronavirus site-based plan would protect us while working in the field.  Our volunteering activities are needed now more than ever. With Spring now sprung, the need for access to greenspace has now

Magic in the air

20 March was the date of the Spring Equinox, when night and day are perfectly balanced with 12 hours of light and 12 hours of darkness. For many of our ancestors this was a special time. The cycle of the sun was vital to them and they watched the skies closely, monitoring for signs of change. In many Celtic cultures

Spring foraging – fresh food for free!

by David Walsh, Cumbernauld Living Landscape Project Officer As winter drifts away and spring emerges, we start to see an abundance of wildflowers back in bloom.  Over the past year it has brought a particular sense of excitement for me.  This is due to my new hobby: foraging! Foraging is often viewed as a bit scary.  None of these plants

Why not all trees are equal

  Part of our work in trying to restore our local wildlife habitats is taking out some of the things that would not be there naturally. You may have seen our teams of Cumbernauld Living Landscape volunteers out and about removing such things – which can range from litter to invasive species of plants. Some plants that are not native

Trees for everyone

By Katie Brown, Cumbernauld Living Landscape trainee If you happen to be going to see the swans down at Broadwood Loch over the holidays, you might well spot the new trees that have been planted by the Cumbernauld Living Landscape volunteers and staff. These are native species that will help local wildlife thrive, so look out for oak, hawthorn, crab

Frosts, fires and foxes – what a way to start a new job!

by Katie Brown, Cumbernauld Natural Connections Trainee For those of you who don’t yet know me, hello, I’m Katie and I’m the new Creating Natural Connections trainee at Cumbernauld Living Landscape. I have lived in Cumbernauld my entire life and in this new role I hope to inspire my local community and learn something new every day. I’m only one

Nature Ninjas keeping paths to nature open for everyone

At such a tough time for everyone, it is important to connect with green spaces.  These connections have been shown, in countless studies, to improve mental health. It is therefore imperative that access to green spaces remains easy and unobstructed.  These are some of Cumbernauld Living Landscape’s guiding principles. We continue to operate our “Nature Ninja” volunteer groups in these

Fabulous Fungi!

Local resident and Cumbernauld Living Landscape volunteer Josh Chambers,  has been out and about in Cumbernauld’s fantastic green spaces again and has found some fabulous fungi! On an early morning walk I stumbled across these tiny toadstools. I am not able to tell what kind they are or anything like that, but I can appreciate them. I can appreciate that