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Connect to the Nectar Network

Earlier this month the team had a brilliant time at St Maurice’s Pond, bug hunting and pond dipping with a group of pupils preparing to make the leap from primary to high school. We saw all sorts of wildlife, but it was the butterflies that stole the show. So once the kids had gone and everything was quiet once more, we decided to get down to some serious counting for Butterfly Conservation’s annual ‘Big Butterfly Count’. Walking through the tall grass and vibrant wildflowers that surround the pond, we soon realised that we were going to need a bigger recording sheet! This summer saw the largest number of painted lady butterflies migrate across Scotland in a decade, and Cumbernauld was no exception. We counted a phenomenal 71 of them, plus many other species including small tortoiseshell, large white and peacock. By allowing ourselves to slow down and take notice we also came across other surprises, like a hefty elephant hawk moth caterpillar and a stunning hawker dragonfly. The whole place was teeming with life. The kind of naturalised grassland found

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Five reasons to volunteer in nature

With summer in the air and thunderstorms crashing about I thought that this would be a good time to introduce myself. I’m David, the new Project Officer with Cumbernauld Living Landscape! My job is to run volunteering activities that will improve green spaces across the town. I have a massive announcement…   Weekly volunteering groups will be starting at the beginning of September!   The groups will run every Tuesday and Thursday, starting from 3 September. Volunteers can sign up for one or two days a week depending on their preference. So why should you volunteer with Cumbernauld Living Landscape? With us you can develop your skills and enhance your employability while improving your local green spaces, experience working in a motivated and passionate team and get fit all at the same time! I’ve already had an amazing experience volunteering this week. We were out at St Maurice’s Pond, cutting back the encroaching vegetation with some HUGE scythes, allowing the public to walk freely along the paths. We also picked up a lot of broken glass at the back of