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Biodiversity and climate change

Climate change and biodiversity are inextricably linked to each other. Sadly, the link is not a good one. For humans, climate change means stronger and more frequent extreme weather events, rising sea levels and increased risk from “vector-borne” diseases such as Zika virus and malaria. For nature the greatest issue, ultimately, is extinction. We are already seeing species being forced out of their natural ranges; year-on-year orange-tip butterflies and tree bumblebees range further north due to a warming climate. These two examples are just the tip of a rapidly melting iceberg. Species that already struggle with habitat loss or degradation are now also competing for food with those that can range outwith their normal territories. Many species are being affected as their lifecycles are changing, with many animals emerging outside the timing of their only food source. Those that can’t travel outwith their normal ranges are dying, as they cannot adapt quick enough. Around the world we are seeing extinction on a scale that has never been seen before. We can change that and give nature a hand. We can

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No Planet B

“Climate action now!” “I’m only wee, leave some Earth for me” “There is no Planet B” On Friday 20th September the Cumbernauld Living Landscape team were proud to join the thousands of children and adults who marched to Glasgow’s George Square as part of the global Climate Strike. It might seem odd to join a climate strike when you work for an environmental organisation, but we knew that we had to add our voices to those of the young people who are leading this inspiring movement. Started by 16-year-old Swedish schoolgirl Greta Thunberg, in the past year there have been hundreds of school climate strikes across the globe. The world’s youth are demanding that decision-makers take bolder steps towards tackling the climate crisis and ending the catastrophic biodiversity loss that the world is currently facing. Greta may be the face of the movement but there are countless others taking action alongside her, including here in Scotland. Greta may be the face of the movement but there are countless others taking action alongside her, including here in Scotland. The Natural Connections

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Earlier signs of spring

When did you see your first snowdrop? The first Wild Ways Well group of the year was out in the middle of January and we were lucky to see them already! Apparently, the dingle-dangles didn’t use to flower before February during the 1950s and 1960s. This leads us to reflect about the climate changing around us. We hear about big weather disasters in other countries, we worry about the polar bears and we might feel vulnerable in the face of the floods happening in our country. I find this all a little bit head-spinning. However, as much as I love looking at the bigger picture, I find it also very useful to zoom in and look at my own situation. It is really something to acknowledge one’s own potential for power. As Gandhi said, “the ocean has no existence if the drop has not”.  I am always inspired by people’s courage and ingenuity. We all have a role and an effect on our planet, our environment, our community and our family. We can be the little drop that is part