This Time It’s Goodbye

Sometimes you don’t realise how far you’ve come until you look back. When I think about the timid trainee who joined the Cumbernauld Living Landscape Project at the end of 2020, I can’t help but feel proud of the journey she has been on. Even just a year ago my imposter syndrome was so severe that I almost didn’t apply

A New Beginning

Sadly I have come to the end of my time as a Creating Natural Connections Trainee with Cumbernauld Living Landscape, so I wanted to take some time to reflect on my past few months helping to protect and enhance Cumbernauld’s many green spaces! Months ago I came to the project desperate to expand my knowledge and to develop more skills

Wild about wetlands!

  Today is World Wetlands Day, which is celebrated every year on 2 February to raise awareness of these amazing habitats. You may be wondering what wetlands are? Well, wetlands are classed as any habitat that is seasonally or permanently flooded with water. This means that rivers, lochs, marshes, peat bogs, estuaries and floodplains are just some examples of wetland

We want your views!

The Scottish Wildlife Trust is inviting comments from stakeholders, local people and organisations on the proposed new Long-Term Forest Plan for its Cumbernauld Reserves. The document below explains what a Forest plan is, how and why the Trust manages its reserves here as it does, and what plans it has for management over the next twenty years. The maps at

Live large and dream small

As we head towards the end of COP26, and our COP26-themed blogs, this poem, a favourite of mine, came to mind: Lore, by R.S Thomas Job Davies, eighty-five Winters old, and still alive After the slow poison And treachery of the seasons. Miserable? Kick my a-se! It needs more than the rain’s hearse, Wind-drawn, to pull me off The great perch

Nature for people – people for nature

Climate change is here, with its soaring temperatures and rising seas, and an increasingly destabilised weather system. Whilst we all know that rising emissions of greenhouse gases are to blame – that’s only half the story. Simultaneously we’ve embarked on a campaign of destruction against the natural world on a scale never-before-seen, tearing apart the very systems that would have

Living Landscapes for a living planet

by Cathleen Thomas, Scottish Wildlife Trust Living Landscapes Programme Manager In the UN’s Decade on Ecosystem Restoration (2021-2030), starting with the UN Biodiversity Conference (COP15) and UN Climate Change Conference (COP26) in October 2021, the world’s focus is on preventing, halting and reversing the degradation of ecosystems – the natural networks that keep our planet working. The Scottish Wildlife Trust’s

A sticky end?

It’s not always in the moment that you realise how poignant an occurrence is – in the grand scheme of things. This is exactly what emerged this week when I visited Abronhill Primary to deliver a Creating Natural Connections session to their upper primary school children. Having been split into 3 groups – the beetle group I recall – had

A wild idea!

A chance comment overheard in a shop, and a forager’s wry joke, should give us hope for the future. ‘It feels like rain’s coming – I can sense a change on its way’, said the Cumbernauld shop assistant I eavesdropped on. ‘I’m picking my dinner’, quipped the brambler I passed on a walk. But what they said sounded to me

The sea starts here

According to a Scottish Government report last year, an estimated 300 million plastic straws, 276 million pieces of plastic cutlery, 50 million plastic plates and 66 million polystyrene food containers are used in Scotland every year. With a population of around 50,000, that means that here in Cumbernauld we are using three million straws a year, 2,760,000 pieces of plastic